Hiking Trails National Parks Travel

Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch

Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch

Julia and I arrived in Moab well after sunset after leaving Capitol Reef National Park, but early enough to grab dinner at a local restaurant. Keeping with my theme of healthy food only on this road trip, we made our way to Zax restaurant, where we both ordered the ‘all you can eat pizza’. We justified it by saying that the all you can eat salad bar was also included. I put two large bowls of salad down, but my main focus was on trying all of the different pizza offerings. Even on the fullest of stomachs, I can do some serious work on a pizza pie. On an empty stomach that had just spent a few too many hours in the car, I was lethal. I’ve been known as a Pizzaterian and a practicing Pastafarian for some time now.


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
Zax Restaurant
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
About 8 Slices In At This Point

After a great night of sleep at Hotel Moab, Julia and I got an early start, as we wanted to be some of the first people entering the park. Moab is located just a few miles from the gates of Arches and Canyonlands National Parks. Arches is the closer of the two, and we only had to drive for 8 minutes before we passed through the entry gates.

Our first stop was at the Delicate Arch trailhead. At the start of the trail for Delicate Arch, the first thing I saw was the rustic Wolfe Ranch. John Wesley Wolf moved to the area in the 1800s after a Civil War injury to his leg, forced him to seek a drier climate. The Wolfes lived at the remote cabin until 1910, when they moved back to Ohio.

The hike to Delicate Arch covers 3 miles and gains 480 feet. The end of this hike is on slabs of rock. Wear proper footwear. 


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
Wolfe Ranch
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
On The Trail

After spending some time learning about Wolfe Ranch, we continued on towards Delicate Arch. The first half mile of trail is a wide and soft path. After this first half mile, much of the trail is on open slickrock that makes for a really fun hike. Make sure to keep an eye out for cairns and ducks, as you don’t want to get headed in the wrong direction. In reality, it’s nearly impossible to get lost here due to the crowds, but it doesn’t hurt to be cautious. Just before the slick rock starts, there is an option to venture off on a side loop trail that will take you to see some Ute Indian petroglyphs. We opted to save these for the hike down, so I’ll save those photos for the later on in this post.


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch And Balanced Rock
The Wider Path
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch And Balanced Rock
Slickrock Looking Back

After the climb up the slickrock slab, the trail enters a narrow wash dotted with junipers. After passing through the wash, the trail gets back onto the slickrock, and this time, in even more spectacular fashion. The sun was beaming through a small arch to the right of the trail just as we traversed a flattened ledge that was wrapped around the parks red walls.


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
The First Arch
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch, Double Arch, And Balanced Rock
The Trail Just Before The Big Reveal

One of the most impressive things about the Delicate Arch Trail, is that you never actually see Delicate Arch until you make the final turn. This makes this arch all the more special. Upon first view, I could instantly see why this is arguably the most recognizable arch in the world. I’ve seen Delicate Arch in countless photos, TV shows, Utah license plates, and most National Park visitor centers, but nothing does this arch justice like seeing it in person.


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch
Delicate Arch
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch
From Below
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch
People For Scale

Julia and I spent quite a bit of time just standing in awe of Delicate Arch and were happy that we woke up early enough to enjoy it without the large crowds. Getting up before sunrise can feel like a bit of a hassle when you’re on vacation, but views like this make it all worth it. Our feeling of zen was quickly shattered though when I heard the crack of plastic on the slickrock behind me. While Julia was taking off her gloves, the wrist strap to her camera went with it. Unfortunately, her camera body was not fixable. On the positive side, her lens and memory card are just fine.

We made our way back on the trail the same way we arrived, only this time we took the small detour to see the Ute Indian petroglyphs. The petroglyphs are estimated to have been carved in the rocks here by Ute Indians sometime between 1650 and 1850. On the rocks you’ll see a horse and rider, big horn sheep, and dogs. It truly is a special piece of art.


Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch
Detour
Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch
Petroglyphs

The trail for the petroglyphs continues on past the rock art and meets back up with the main trail right near the entrance. It was a morning full of beautiful views and ineffable natural beauty, and the best part was that our day was just getting started.


I'm Drew, creator of Trail to Peak. Trail to Peak brings content to life on the web through breath-taking photography and captivating video. I launched Trail to Peak in 2014 with a goal to inspire readers to get outside and enjoy the great outdoors. I have traveled to 19 countries, walked Camino de Santiago, hiked the John Muir Trail, trekked through the Andes of Peru, and am constantly seeking new adventures in my home state of California. Joining me on my weekly adventures is my partner, Julia, our son, Owen, and our two goldendoodles, Isla and Lilly.

10 comments on “Arches National Park: Hiking To Delicate Arch

  1. lovely photos

  2. You and Julia are really great because taking the new challenges. Might be the place is a danger zone, where you do not get medical and basic (water) allowances easily.

  3. I so have to make a trip to this area. And to see Wolfe House, the great-great-grandfather of the Tiny Home movement. 😉

    • haha, yes. There was actually two structures in the area. Mr. Wolfe lived in a smaller and more simple structure for 10 years before he had family come and stay with him. They found the dwelling far to harsh and built the roomier structure seen in the picture.

  4. Anonymous

    Thanks for a great post. Your photographs are excellent.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: