Salkantay Trek
Peru Treks Salkantay Trek

Salkantay Trek to Machu Picchu Day 2

The Salkantay Trek begins south of Machu Picchu in the town of Soraypampa at 12,800ft. Hikers cross over the 15,177ft Salkantay Pass on day one, and then continue for 40 miles of mostly downhill trails on their way to Machu Picchu. In this guide, I’ll provide all of the information a traveler will need to enjoy a hike of the Salkantay Trek with a final day at Machu Picchu.

See The Full Salkantay Trek Guide

On day 2 of the Salkantay trek, we woke to the faint hint of light that paints the sky just before daybreak. The sun rises a little later in the mountains, as it takes a little more time to clear the towering peaks on the horizon. Our first was a cold one, as temperatures got down close to single digits (F). The sunrise that arrived at the same time as breakfast was gorgeous, and revealed two snow capped peaks nestled just behind our campsite. It was the perfect way to begin the day, as I say enjoying my coffee, bread, and quinoa porridge while taking in the views.

Salkantay Trek
Horses At Sunrise
Salkantay Trek
Mountain Views

Day 2 was to be the longest of our trek at 15 miles, and almost all of it downhill. One of the more interesting aspects of the Salkantay Trek is the number of micro climates. Starting our trek at above 12000ft and climbing to 15000 showed us a great deal of the alpine beauty in the Andes. On this day, we started in a high altitude of Wayracmachay and descended through a canopy of trees and into a humid jungle. As much as I was excited about getting started for day two, I couldn’t keep myself from looking back. I felt like I should pinch myself and wake up, as the landscape around me was something I only though possible in the depth of dreams.

The humidity really started to pick up after the first 5 miles, which descended rather quickly. It was surreal to see how lush and green the world around me suddenly became, with veins of water supplying life in every direction. We crossed a few small wooden bridges and came upon a small village. I big dog greeted us, as a young women with children in tow, sold treats and soda. It was just a short break there before we made the short walk over to our lunch spot. Our lunch spot looked back into the valley and up to the mountains from which we came earlier in the day.

Salkantay Trek
First Stop
Salkantay Trek
Great Place For Lunch

After lunch, we had a long and winding hike to our campsite of La Playa. The amount of water here really kicked up the humidity, and for the first time, we could hear the mosquitoes buzzing. Luckily, the swarms weren’t too bad.

Salkantay Trek
Bridge Crossing
Salkantay Trek
Waterfall

Our final break for the day was at a small dwelling just off of the trail. Julia and I got there ahead of the group and had about 15 minutes to hang out. There were chickens running around, and small kids playing with a soccerball just outside of some clothes drying on a line.

Salkantay Trek
Final Break for the Day

The final section of day 2 leaves a trail and joins up with a dirt road to La Playa. From here we passed though a village and into what was the most populous area we had seen thus far on the trek. There were no cars though, just people walking alongside us on the road, and warm eyes glancing out of houses to what must be an ordinary sight to them now. The campsite of La Playa sits just in front of a few benches and a small market. Our tents were pitched on the large field of grass just in front of the market. We changed clothes, cleaned up a bit, and settled in for another incredible dinner from Mario. It was another spectacular day, and we were beaming with excitement for day 3, a climb to Llaqtapata.

See The Full Salkantay Trek Guide

I’m Drew, creator of Trail to Peak. Trail to Peak brings content to life on the web through breath-taking photography and captivating video. I launched Trail to Peak in 2014 with a goal to inspire readers to get outside and enjoy the great outdoors. I have traveled to 19 countries, walked Camino de Santiago, hiked the John Muir Trail, trekked through the Andes of Peru, and am constantly seeking new adventures in my home state of California. Joining me on my weekly adventures is my partner, Julia, our son, Owen, and our two goldendoodles, Isla and Lilly.

12 comments on “Salkantay Trek to Machu Picchu Day 2

  1. Cindy Clauson

    Your photos are awesome and your journey inspiring! You are hiking for the many who cannot.. Travel mercies as your walk on. Bless you and your traveling companions, Cindy

  2. wow! this looks like a great experience! great photos too 🙂

  3. Gorgeous photos!

  4. I love your blog posts on the Salkantay trek! My husband and I plan to do this exact trek with Alpaca Expeditions in October, so it is nice to get somewhat of a preview! Hopefully we have the same great weather you had.

    Quick question, on day 2, did you check out the Santa Teresa hot natural thermals? Alpaca mentions this on their website, you can soak in the thermal baths for around 5 Peruvian soles. I was wondering if you had checked it out or thought it wasn’t worthwhile. Thank you!

  5. Pingback: Desde Salkantay hacia Machu Picchu: Día 02 | Come to Peru

  6. Been to Machu Picchu twice on my own, but not trekking. If I ever get the opportunity to be in Cusco again, Salkantay Trek definitely is on my list. As usual, you convey a great sense of calm and altitude beauty through your pictures.
    Thanks for the advice on this trek!
    Jul’

    • Wow, so cool that you’ve been to Machu Picchu twice! I would love to go back again soon. The Salkantay trek is a lot of fun and a great way to arrive at Machu Picchu!

      • I’m already very happy with those 2 times there. Each was a special moment and I got to climb Wyana Picchu the first time and Machu Picchu peak the second. The views are simply spectacular.
        Salkantay sure sounds like the next best thing I’ll have to do there when/if I get back!
        Thanks for showing the way!

      • Thanks for reading! We hiked Huayna Picchu, but didn’t get to do Machu Picchu Peak. Maybe we’ll have to do that one next time!

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